August 2021

A Brief History: High Tech

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image="8056" img_size="full" add_caption="yes" alignment="center"][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][vc_empty_space height="45px"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] “Industrial” and “Minimalism” are movements we have come to know and love, especially when it comes to interior design and architecture. But these trends are no where close to being new. Like many other industries the world of design has a way of taking inspiration from the generations before. Unlike like leg warmers and spandex some trends from this time period are a little more appealing than others. High-Tech was a popular design trend in the late 70s and early 80s. Practicality was the name of the game, it was all about smooth and bright textures, and showcasing the functionality of a space. Using materials like metal, glass, and concrete, spaces were meant to feel open and light. And when it came to decor and furniture no frills or flounce was allowed, no extras at all really unless it was pipes, air ducts, valves, beams… pretty much anything that would showcase just how functional the space really is. This design trend didn’t last long (less than 15 years) and was eventually abandoned in favor of more extravagant trends. That is until recent years, there has been a resurgence of this “industrial loft” appearance with large glass windows and open spaces, not only in commercial and office settings but in residential as well. Of course there is a lot more to this design trend so if you are interested in reading more have a look at some of these links: The New York Times: What became of High-Tech?What Are the Main Features of High-Tech? ...